Form and Content

Theater is that in which the form and the content are different entities.

In dance, the form and the content are the same entity.

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2 thoughts on “Form and Content

  1. Hi Andrew-I'm not sure that your definitions of theater (as a form in which "form and the content are different) and dance (as a form in which "form and the content are the same") are sufficient. To make my point, let me offer the example of Childs/Wilson's Einstein on the Beach (currently making a comeback). In that work, the dance is more than its form due to its context. To put it another way, it has function and value in the work beyond its form. I suppose if you pull out the dance (as Lucinda did, thereby creating her "Dance" series) and present in isolation of its theatrical context, it becomes more purely form. So I think your definitions leave out the issue of context (narrative and visual context, for starters).cheers from across the pondHope

  2. Hi Hope,Thanks for reading my blog. I would say that this definition of theater and dance does take context into account.When Childs' choreography is located in Einstein on the Beach, it functions as theater because it relates to the play. Its form is in service to the content of the play. When Childs' choreography is "present[ed] in isolation of its theatrical context, it becomes more purely form", it becomes more dance.This definition of theater and dance is a definition of function not form. The form of the choreography, whether in the play or in isolation, doesn't change, but its function does.No definition is sufficient, but can only describe a fraction of what something is. This definition, along with others in this blog, is part of my search for ideas to describe work beyond the form and more of the function in relation to performance.Hope y'all are well,Andrew

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